Adobe Media Encoder: Introduction

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If you need to transcode video from one format to another, or compress your videos for distribution on the internet, Adobe Media Encoder is the tool for you. Watch as video compression guru Francesco Schiavon shows you how it's done!

When we needed a tutorial on Adobe Media Encoder, we turned to our resident video compression guru, Francesco Schiavon. Francesco is a legend at macProVideo.com not only for being a renaissance man when it comes to software for Apple Computers, but also for being the mentor of Martin Sitter, the Founder of macProVideo.com! Francesco taught Martin the secrets that were used to create the compression system you watch every day while viewing macProVideo.com tutorials!

In this comprehensive, 5-hour tutorial you'll learn all of the important features and techniques that make Adobe media Encoder one of the best video compression tools on the market today. This tutorial starts with a detailed overview of Adobe Media Encoder's Que. You'll earn how to add projects to the cue, and how to make the basic settings that go into any compression project.

Next follows a detailed section on making the settings that will set your videos apart from the rest. You'll learn how to crop videos, adjust for aspect ratio, add filters and blurs, work with interlacing, and most important of all, how to set the bit rate that will provide the best looking compressed videos.

Towards the end of the tutorial there's an important section on working with Flash video. You'll learn the difference between F4V and FLV video, what cue points are, and how to encode alpha channels into your Flash videos.

Table of Contents:
1. Introduction
2. What Does the AME Do?
3. The AME Workflow
4. Basic Preferences
5. Adding Source Files to the AME Queue
6. Adding Premiere Projects to the Queue
7. Adding AE Compositions to the Queue
8. Adding Soundbooth Projects
9. Preparing FCP Movies for AME
10. Preparing FCP Movies for AME2
11. About the Format Options
12. About the Preset Options
13. About the Output File Column
14. Managing Items in the AME Queue - Part 1
15. Managing items in the AME Queue - Part 2
16. Dealing with Failed Encodings
17. About the General Preferences
18. About the Export Settings - Source Preview
19. Cropping Source Videos
20. Cropping Source Videos in the Export Settings Window
21. Previewing Aspect Ratio Correction
22. About the Encoding Options in the Export Settings Window
23. Saving a Custom Preset for Later Reuse
24. Managing Saved Custom Presets
25. When to use the Gaussian Blur Filter - Part 1
26. When to use the Gaussian Blur Filter - Part 2
27. Dealing with Interlaced Analogue SD Sources
28. How to Choose the Output Frame Rate
29. How to set Field Order and Pixel Aspect Ratio
30. When to Check Render at Maximum Depth
31. About the Bitrate Settings
32. About the Audio tab in the Export Settings Window
33. About the FTP Tab in the Export Settings Window
34. Creating a Watch Folder to Start Compression Automatically
35. Starting up a Watch Folder Encoding - Part 1
36. Starting up a Watch Folder Encoding - Part 2
37. Exporting to the AME from Within Premiere Pro
38. Encoding Right Away
39. Why Export -> Media is Greyed Out in Premiere Pro
40. Editing Queued Premiere Pro Sequences
41. Creating intermediate Movies
42. Exporting to the AME from Within After Effects - Part 1
43. Exporting to the AME from within After Effects - Part 2
44. A Suggestion About Encoding AE Compositions
45. About Formats for the Web
46. Tweaking H.264 Presets
47. Basic Settings for 4x3 Interlaced SD Sources
48. Setting Dimensions and Bitrate for 4x3 SD Sources
49. About the Bitrate Settings
50. Overview of all the Settings for a SD Source - Part 1
51. Overview of all the Settings for a SD Source - Part 2
52. Tweaking Settings for 16x9 HD Sources
53. Tweaking the Audio Settings
54. Saving our Custom Web Settings
55. Checking Out the Outputs
56. Why Would You Select FLV or F4V Output Format?
57. What's the Difference Between FLV and F4V?
58. Setting Flash Cue Points Within AME - Part 1
59. Setting Flash Cue Points Within AME - Part 2
60. Setting Flash Cue Points from Premiere Pro
61. Setting Flash Cue Points from After Effects
62. Encoding Alpha Channel for Flash Video
63. Tweaking Flash Video Settings - Part 1
64. Tweaking Flash Video Settings - Part 2
65. About Flash Video and Audio Bitrates
66. Wrapping up Flash Encoding
67. About Encoding Windows Media on a Mac
68. Windows Media Settings - Part 1
69. Windows Media settings - Part 2
70. Selecting Presets for Mobile Devices
71. Tweaking the Video Settings for Mobile Devices - Part 1
72. Tweaking the Video Settings for Mobile Devices - Part 2
73. Tweaking the Audio Settings for Mobile Devices - Part 3
74. Tweaking Settings for HD Sources for Mobile Devices
75. Syncing Videos Using iTunes
76. Understanding Profile and Level Settings - Part 1
77. Understanding Profile and Level Settings - Part 2
78. How the AME Manages Settings
79. Diagram for 16x9 Web Encoding
80. Diagram for 4x3 SD Web Encoding
81. Diagram for Encoding for Mobile Devices
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Adobe Media Encoder: Introduction

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